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National Parks

BUCKET LIST Capitol Reef National Park One Day Itinerary

Jan 6, 2024

National Parks

BUCKET LIST Capitol Reef National Park One Day Itinerary

Jan 6, 2024

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I'm a travel creator and influencer coach based out of Arizona. This blog is where I share the best itineraries for US & beyond, 63 US National Parks, and influencer tips.

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Perfectly sitting at the heart of Utah’s south-central desert, Capitol Reef National Park is as pretty as a picture.

The park often gets snubbed for bigger ones nearby, like the Grand Canyon and Canyonlands, but there is something unique about Capitol Reef — a wrinkle on the earth. 

What’s that, you may wonder? This wrinkle is called the Waterpocket Fold. It is a 100-mile geological feature that characterizes Capitol Reef’s colorful rugged landscapes.

The park is home to beautiful red cliffs, canyons, bridges, and natural domes, making it one of the best national parks in Utah

There is so much to see and do here, and the best part is that you can explore most of the highlights in Capitol Reef in one day!

This one-day Capitol Reef itinerary takes you to the park’s best hikes, scenic drives, sunrise and sunset spots, and mesmerizing overlooks.

So strap on your hiking boots and get ready for a magical day in Capitol Reef National Park.

Disclaimer: Hey explorer! This post contains affiliate links which means I earn a small percentage of each purchase made through my links. I only ever recommend products I believe in and appreciate your support if you decide to use my links—thank you!

Things To Do in Capitol Reef National Park in One Day

Before we dive into this perfect one-day itinerary, let’s unpack some of the best things to do in Capitol Reef National Park.

And make sure you have an America The Beautiful Pass!

Exploring the Best Hikes in Capitol Reef National Park

Capitol Reef has some of the best hiking trails in all of Utah. Here are a few trails you should consider taking on during your visit.

Hickman Bridge Trail: This popular hike leads to the iconic Hickman Bridge, a natural sandstone arch that sees visitors pouring in. This overlook offers panoramic views of the Waterpocket Fold and is relatively short, only a two-mile round trip.

Cassidy Arch Trail: Named after the infamous outlaw Butch Cassidy, this 3.1-mile hike takes you to a stunning natural arch with breathtaking views of the park’s oddly-shaped rock formations.

Grand Wash Trail: The narrow and scenic Grand Wash is a popular hiking spot in the park. The 4.7-mile hike can be trekked out-and-back or combined with Cassidy Arch. Grand Wash’s towering canyon walls are the star of the show.

Cohab Canyon Trail: The 1.7-mile trek to Cohab Canyon offers the most diverse hiking experience in the park, from narrow slot canyons to dramatic hole-filled canyon walls.

Off-Roading

The most famous off-roading area in the park is Cathedral Valley. This hardy region is difficult to navigate, so you’ll need a high-clearance, four-wheel-drive vehicle.

You’ll find unbelievable rock formations here, like the towering Temples of the Sun and Moon and the Gypsum Sinkhole.

Note: Road conditions are highly influenced by weather conditions. Check in at the visitor center, and get the necessary permits. Bring lots of water, food, an emergency kit, and make sure you have enough fuel.

Taking a Scenic Drive

Capitol Reef’s main scenic drive along Highway 24 is dotted with amazing views of the Waterpocket Fold and lots of overlooks where you can make quick stops. 

River Activities

The Fremont River flows through Capitol Reef National Park, offering you opportunities for fishing, kayaking, and even cooling off on hot summer days.

Fruit Picking

Depending on the season, you can pick fresh fruit from the historic orchards in the Fruita District.

You can pick apples, pears, cherries, and apricots here, but before you do, check if the orchards are open for fruit picking at the visitor center.

Wildlife Viewing

During your visit, keep an eye out for the park’s various wildlife, like mule deer, desert bighorn sheep, coyotes, and bird species. Birdwatching is a popular activity in Capitol Reef.

Rock Climbing and Bouldering

You’ll find several climbing zones in Capitol Reef; climbing enthusiasts will love tackling the sandstone cliffs and boulders in the park.

Be sure to read through the rules and regulations for your own safety. Also, you’ll need a permit for rock climbing, which you can get at the visitor center. 

Attending Ranger Programs

If you would like to gain deeper insights into the park’s geology, ecology, or history, a ranger-led program is the best way to go. You can sign up for these at the visitor center.

Stargazing

Capitol Reef is designated as a Dark Sky Park, making it one of the best places in the United States for stargazing. On clear nights, the Milky Way and countless stars light up the dark skies.

You’d also like: Grand Canyon Versus Canyonlands

Arrival — Driving from Moab to Capitol Reef

Moab City is one of the best places to stay when visiting Capitol Reef National Park.

It is located almost 140 miles from the park, which takes about two hours of driving time. Head over to the shops the day before to get supplies. 

Consider staying in this adorable Vrbo with a view or this epic hillside property!

Catch the Sunrise at Goosenecks Overlook

Rise early and drive to Goosenecks Overlook to witness a stunning sunrise over the deep canyons and winding river below.

You’ll love the play of light and dancing shadows as the sun rises — this is a photographer’s dream.

Morning – Visiting Capitol Reef National Park

The best way to kick off your Capitol Reef one-day itinerary is to start slowly.

Take your time to familiarize yourself with the park’s amenities and chat with the rangers about the road conditions. 

Consider staying in this adorable Vrbo with a view or this epic hillside property!

Capitol Reef Visitor Center

The first stop on your itinerary is perhaps the most important one.

The Capitol Reef Visitor Center is a treasure trove of information. Here, you can find maps, exhibitions about the park, rangers to answer questions, and a bookshop where you can grab some souvenirs. 

The center opens every day except for major holidays like Thanksgiving and Christmas Day.

It’s open Monday to Sunday from 8 am to 4:30 pm and from 9 am to 4:30 pm in winter. 

Capitol Reef Scenic Drive

About 25 miles of Utah’s Scenic Byway 24 traverses through the rugged terrains of Capitol Reef National Park.

It’s perhaps the most fascinating portion of Highway 24 as it offers breathtaking views of the Waterpocket Fold. 

Start the drive from the visitor center and head east toward the Fruita Historic District.

As the road winds through beautiful orchards, you’ll pass the Gifford Farmhouse, which houses a store and a museum. When I went here in my campervan, we stopped in the farmhouse to have pie and LOVED it!

Drive past the Fruita Campground towards the Grand Wash, where you’ll find the trail to Cassidy Arch.

Stop your drive at the Capitol Gorge, where the paved road ends. This is also a great stop to include in a Utah National Parks road trip!

Mid-Morning – Capitol Reef National Park Itinerary

Midday is when your itinerary kicks into full gear.

You’ll be exploring one of the park’s most fertile terrain and making a stop where you can buy snacks and learn more about the area. 

Consider staying in this adorable Vrbo with a view or this epic hillside property!

Fruita Historic District and Gifford House

Nestled among lush valleys beautifully contrasted by soaring red cliffs, the Fruita Historic District is often considered the heart of Capitol Reef.

The valley offers plenty of outdoor activities, like hiking trails along the Scenic Drive, fruit-bearing orchards, and ranger-led programs.

Make a stop at Gifford House to try their magnificent pies. The homestead was built in the early 1900s for a family of Mormon pioneers.

Today, it houses a shop where you can buy delicious baked goods and museum exhibits courtesy of the Capitol Reef Natural History Association.

You’ll also find a barn on the property. It houses a number of horses and makes for stunning photos, so this is when you need to be snapping away with your travel camera

Note: Gifford House is only open seasonally, from March 14th (Pi Day) to late November. 

Cohab Canyon Hike

This hike offers one of the most unique hiking experiences in Capitol Reef.

The trail is full of switchbacks, dramatic cliffs with holes, and narrow slot canyons with towering, multi-colored walls.

The trailhead is along the Scenic Drive, after the barn, and before the Fruita Campground.

Afternoon – What to Do in Capitol Reef

Before you continue with your one-day itinerary, take a break to have some lunch and re-energize.

The afternoon is often the hottest time of the day, so this pit stop will do you good. Afterwards, you’ll explore the last highlights that Capitol Reef has in store for you.

Consider staying in this adorable Vrbo with a view or this epic hillside property!

Picnic Lunch at The Fruita Picnic Area

Located within Fruita Campground, this picnic area is arguably the best place to have lunch in Capitol Reef National Park. 

When Scott and I lived in a campervan, we stopped here for a little picnic lunch and had the best time relaxing under the trees.

Find a nice shady spot under one of the numerous trees, lay out your picnic blanket (or sit on a picnic bench), and enjoy your lunch while admiring the stunning scenery around you.

And don’t worry if you didn’t bring your picnic basket; you can just hop into Gifford House for homemade pies, treats, and other goodies. 

All these little gems make it easy to see what makes this America national park so special!

Petroglyphs Panels

Head back to Highway 24, where you’ll find two wooden boardwalks that lead to the captivating Petroglyphs Panels.

These ancient rock markings depict the lives of the Fremont and Ancestral Puebloan people who lived here between 300 and 1300 Common Era (CE). 

The rock art appears to be narrating Fremont stories, including their crop cycles, hunting patterns, and traditional beliefs.

Hickman Bridge Trail

Less than a mile away from the Petroglyphs Panels, you’ll stumble upon the trail to the magical Hickman Bridge.

This natural arch stands at 300 feet over the Fremont River and is one of the most impressive viewpoints in Capitol Reef, and you can reach it through a short two-mile hike.

The trail begins at the Hickman Bridge Pull Out along Highway 24, where you’ll find a small parking area and restrooms.

Grand Wash Trail

After a 10-minute drive along Highway 24, you’ll come across the Grand Wash Trailhead.

This hike is one of the most popular for families in Capitol Reef. It’s a 4.7-mile hike, but you can make it shorter by driving. 

The trail takes you through a gorge with narrow slot canyons and towering walls.

If you are up for a longer trek, you can extend your hike by continuing deeper into the canyons towards Cassidy Arch.

Read Next: Arizona Utah Road Trip

Evening – What To See in Capitol Reef National Park

Wind down at the end of the day by heading to one of the mesmerizing sunset spots in Capitol Reef National Park.

There are several spots to choose from, so make sure you pick the best one for you.

Consider staying in this adorable Vrbo with a view or this epic hillside property!

Sunset at Panorama Point

End the day with a captivating sunset at Panorama Point.

Here, you’ll be awarded with stunning views of the park’s jagged terrain bathed in golden hues.

Marvel at the multi-colored cliffs as the sun sets, and the skies boast tones of red, orange, and pink.

Sunset Point and Goosenecks Overlook are less than a mile away from Panorama Point, and they are both great alternatives to catch the spectacular sunset over Capitol Reef. 

Night – What To Do at Capitol Reef National Park

Wrap up your day in Capitol Reef National Park with an amazing experience under the dark skies. 

Consider staying in this adorable Vrbo with a view or this epic hillside property!

Stargazing

As a designated Dark Sky Park, Capitol Reef is one of the best places to go stargazing in the United States.

The Milky Way reveals itself with thousands of stars dotted in the dark sky. Keep your eyes open for nocturnal desert animals, like ringtails, kangaroo rats, owls, bats, and raccoons. 

Where to Stay Near Capitol Reef

Capitol Reef Resort — Stay in a luxury oasis in the desert at Capitol Reef Resort. This hotel is located along Highway 24, about eight minutes from Panorama Point. You’ll enjoy modern amenities, like a pool, a hot tub, and a fitness center. Check Rates and Availability.

Robert’s Roost — Looking for something a little private? This 3-bedroom apartment offers all the mod-cons, including a fully equipped kitchen, laundry facilities, and an outdoor swimming pool to cool off on hot days. Check Rates and Availability.

Camping — The Fruita Campground is the most modern one in Capitol Reef. The campground has 71 campsites and features picnic tables, fire pits, grills, restrooms, and dump stations. A nightly fee of $25 is charged, and the campground is open all year round. Reserve a Spot Here.

What to Pack

Your packing list for Capitol Reef National Park depends on the season you are visiting. But there are a few key items that are must-adds to every list.

Refillable Water Bottle — You’ll need a big water bottle for your trip to Capitol Reef, especially if you are going to the remote areas of the park.

Picnic Basket — There are no lodges or restaurants within the national park, so packing a picnic basket is a must! You’ll find picnic areas where you can sit and enjoy your meal amidst the natural beauty of Capitol Reef.

Day Pack — This nifty backpack is ideal for carrying essential items, like your water bottle, sunscreen, and a map.

Hiking Boots — You’ll need comfortable and durable hiking shoes to explore Capitol Reef’s rugged terrain. You can also bring trekking poles if you’ll be hiking the park’s strenuous trails. 

One Day in Capitol Reef National Park | Wrapped Up

Capitol Reef National Park is one magical place. From the narrow slot canyons with dramatic walls to rugged peaks that soar over the red landscape, this park is a haven for outdoor lovers.

This one-day itinerary takes you through the park’s most popular attractions from dusk to dawn.

So, if you’re on a mission to explore the red-rock state, don’t miss out on stunning overlooks and natural arches by adding Capitol Reef to your Utah National Parks road trip.

Perfectly sitting at the heart of Utah’s south-central desert, Capitol Reef National Park is as pretty as a picture.

The park often gets snubbed for bigger ones nearby, like the Grand Canyon and Canyonlands, but there is something unique about Capitol Reef — a wrinkle on the earth. 

What’s that, you may wonder? This wrinkle is called the Waterpocket Fold. It is a 100-mile geological feature that characterizes Capitol Reef’s colorful rugged landscapes.

The park is home to beautiful red cliffs, canyons, bridges, and natural domes, making it one of the best national parks in Utah

There is so much to see and do here, and the best part is that you can explore most of the highlights in Capitol Reef in one day!

This one-day Capitol Reef itinerary takes you to the park’s best hikes, scenic drives, sunrise and sunset spots, and mesmerizing overlooks.

So strap on your hiking boots and get ready for a magical day in Capitol Reef National Park.

Disclaimer: Hey explorer! This post contains affiliate links which means I earn a small percentage of each purchase made through my links. I only ever recommend products I believe in and appreciate your support if you decide to use my links—thank you!

Things To Do in Capitol Reef National Park in One Day

Before we dive into this perfect one-day itinerary, let’s unpack some of the best things to do in Capitol Reef National Park.

And make sure you have an America The Beautiful Pass!

Exploring the Best Hikes in Capitol Reef National Park

Capitol Reef has some of the best hiking trails in all of Utah. Here are a few trails you should consider taking on during your visit.

Hickman Bridge Trail: This popular hike leads to the iconic Hickman Bridge, a natural sandstone arch that sees visitors pouring in. This overlook offers panoramic views of the Waterpocket Fold and is relatively short, only a two-mile round trip.

Cassidy Arch Trail: Named after the infamous outlaw Butch Cassidy, this 3.1-mile hike takes you to a stunning natural arch with breathtaking views of the park’s oddly-shaped rock formations.

Grand Wash Trail: The narrow and scenic Grand Wash is a popular hiking spot in the park. The 4.7-mile hike can be trekked out-and-back or combined with Cassidy Arch. Grand Wash’s towering canyon walls are the star of the show.

Cohab Canyon Trail: The 1.7-mile trek to Cohab Canyon offers the most diverse hiking experience in the park, from narrow slot canyons to dramatic hole-filled canyon walls.

Off-Roading

The most famous off-roading area in the park is Cathedral Valley. This hardy region is difficult to navigate, so you’ll need a high-clearance, four-wheel-drive vehicle.

You’ll find unbelievable rock formations here, like the towering Temples of the Sun and Moon and the Gypsum Sinkhole.

Note: Road conditions are highly influenced by weather conditions. Check in at the visitor center, and get the necessary permits. Bring lots of water, food, an emergency kit, and make sure you have enough fuel.

Taking a Scenic Drive

Capitol Reef’s main scenic drive along Highway 24 is dotted with amazing views of the Waterpocket Fold and lots of overlooks where you can make quick stops. 

River Activities

The Fremont River flows through Capitol Reef National Park, offering you opportunities for fishing, kayaking, and even cooling off on hot summer days.

Fruit Picking

Depending on the season, you can pick fresh fruit from the historic orchards in the Fruita District.

You can pick apples, pears, cherries, and apricots here, but before you do, check if the orchards are open for fruit picking at the visitor center.

Wildlife Viewing

During your visit, keep an eye out for the park’s various wildlife, like mule deer, desert bighorn sheep, coyotes, and bird species. Birdwatching is a popular activity in Capitol Reef.

Rock Climbing and Bouldering

You’ll find several climbing zones in Capitol Reef; climbing enthusiasts will love tackling the sandstone cliffs and boulders in the park.

Be sure to read through the rules and regulations for your own safety. Also, you’ll need a permit for rock climbing, which you can get at the visitor center. 

Attending Ranger Programs

If you would like to gain deeper insights into the park’s geology, ecology, or history, a ranger-led program is the best way to go. You can sign up for these at the visitor center.

Stargazing

Capitol Reef is designated as a Dark Sky Park, making it one of the best places in the United States for stargazing. On clear nights, the Milky Way and countless stars light up the dark skies.

You’d also like: Grand Canyon Versus Canyonlands

Arrival — Driving from Moab to Capitol Reef

Moab City is one of the best places to stay when visiting Capitol Reef National Park.

It is located almost 140 miles from the park, which takes about two hours of driving time. Head over to the shops the day before to get supplies. 

Consider staying in this adorable Vrbo with a view or this epic hillside property!

Catch the Sunrise at Goosenecks Overlook

Rise early and drive to Goosenecks Overlook to witness a stunning sunrise over the deep canyons and winding river below.

You’ll love the play of light and dancing shadows as the sun rises — this is a photographer’s dream.

Morning – Visiting Capitol Reef National Park

The best way to kick off your Capitol Reef one-day itinerary is to start slowly.

Take your time to familiarize yourself with the park’s amenities and chat with the rangers about the road conditions. 

Consider staying in this adorable Vrbo with a view or this epic hillside property!

Capitol Reef Visitor Center

The first stop on your itinerary is perhaps the most important one.

The Capitol Reef Visitor Center is a treasure trove of information. Here, you can find maps, exhibitions about the park, rangers to answer questions, and a bookshop where you can grab some souvenirs. 

The center opens every day except for major holidays like Thanksgiving and Christmas Day.

It’s open Monday to Sunday from 8 am to 4:30 pm and from 9 am to 4:30 pm in winter. 

Capitol Reef Scenic Drive

About 25 miles of Utah’s Scenic Byway 24 traverses through the rugged terrains of Capitol Reef National Park.

It’s perhaps the most fascinating portion of Highway 24 as it offers breathtaking views of the Waterpocket Fold. 

Start the drive from the visitor center and head east toward the Fruita Historic District.

As the road winds through beautiful orchards, you’ll pass the Gifford Farmhouse, which houses a store and a museum. When I went here in my campervan, we stopped in the farmhouse to have pie and LOVED it!

Drive past the Fruita Campground towards the Grand Wash, where you’ll find the trail to Cassidy Arch.

Stop your drive at the Capitol Gorge, where the paved road ends. This is also a great stop to include in a Utah National Parks road trip!

Mid-Morning – Capitol Reef National Park Itinerary

Midday is when your itinerary kicks into full gear.

You’ll be exploring one of the park’s most fertile terrain and making a stop where you can buy snacks and learn more about the area. 

Consider staying in this adorable Vrbo with a view or this epic hillside property!

Fruita Historic District and Gifford House

Nestled among lush valleys beautifully contrasted by soaring red cliffs, the Fruita Historic District is often considered the heart of Capitol Reef.

The valley offers plenty of outdoor activities, like hiking trails along the Scenic Drive, fruit-bearing orchards, and ranger-led programs.

Make a stop at Gifford House to try their magnificent pies. The homestead was built in the early 1900s for a family of Mormon pioneers.

Today, it houses a shop where you can buy delicious baked goods and museum exhibits courtesy of the Capitol Reef Natural History Association.

You’ll also find a barn on the property. It houses a number of horses and makes for stunning photos, so this is when you need to be snapping away with your travel camera

Note: Gifford House is only open seasonally, from March 14th (Pi Day) to late November. 

Cohab Canyon Hike

This hike offers one of the most unique hiking experiences in Capitol Reef.

The trail is full of switchbacks, dramatic cliffs with holes, and narrow slot canyons with towering, multi-colored walls.

The trailhead is along the Scenic Drive, after the barn, and before the Fruita Campground.

Afternoon – What to Do in Capitol Reef

Before you continue with your one-day itinerary, take a break to have some lunch and re-energize.

The afternoon is often the hottest time of the day, so this pit stop will do you good. Afterwards, you’ll explore the last highlights that Capitol Reef has in store for you.

Consider staying in this adorable Vrbo with a view or this epic hillside property!

Picnic Lunch at The Fruita Picnic Area

Located within Fruita Campground, this picnic area is arguably the best place to have lunch in Capitol Reef National Park. 

When Scott and I lived in a campervan, we stopped here for a little picnic lunch and had the best time relaxing under the trees.

Find a nice shady spot under one of the numerous trees, lay out your picnic blanket (or sit on a picnic bench), and enjoy your lunch while admiring the stunning scenery around you.

And don’t worry if you didn’t bring your picnic basket; you can just hop into Gifford House for homemade pies, treats, and other goodies. 

All these little gems make it easy to see what makes this America national park so special!

Petroglyphs Panels

Head back to Highway 24, where you’ll find two wooden boardwalks that lead to the captivating Petroglyphs Panels.

These ancient rock markings depict the lives of the Fremont and Ancestral Puebloan people who lived here between 300 and 1300 Common Era (CE). 

The rock art appears to be narrating Fremont stories, including their crop cycles, hunting patterns, and traditional beliefs.

Hickman Bridge Trail

Less than a mile away from the Petroglyphs Panels, you’ll stumble upon the trail to the magical Hickman Bridge.

This natural arch stands at 300 feet over the Fremont River and is one of the most impressive viewpoints in Capitol Reef, and you can reach it through a short two-mile hike.

The trail begins at the Hickman Bridge Pull Out along Highway 24, where you’ll find a small parking area and restrooms.

Grand Wash Trail

After a 10-minute drive along Highway 24, you’ll come across the Grand Wash Trailhead.

This hike is one of the most popular for families in Capitol Reef. It’s a 4.7-mile hike, but you can make it shorter by driving. 

The trail takes you through a gorge with narrow slot canyons and towering walls.

If you are up for a longer trek, you can extend your hike by continuing deeper into the canyons towards Cassidy Arch.

Read Next: Arizona Utah Road Trip

Evening – What To See in Capitol Reef National Park

Wind down at the end of the day by heading to one of the mesmerizing sunset spots in Capitol Reef National Park.

There are several spots to choose from, so make sure you pick the best one for you.

Consider staying in this adorable Vrbo with a view or this epic hillside property!

Sunset at Panorama Point

End the day with a captivating sunset at Panorama Point.

Here, you’ll be awarded with stunning views of the park’s jagged terrain bathed in golden hues.

Marvel at the multi-colored cliffs as the sun sets, and the skies boast tones of red, orange, and pink.

Sunset Point and Goosenecks Overlook are less than a mile away from Panorama Point, and they are both great alternatives to catch the spectacular sunset over Capitol Reef. 

Night – What To Do at Capitol Reef National Park

Wrap up your day in Capitol Reef National Park with an amazing experience under the dark skies. 

Consider staying in this adorable Vrbo with a view or this epic hillside property!

Stargazing

As a designated Dark Sky Park, Capitol Reef is one of the best places to go stargazing in the United States.

The Milky Way reveals itself with thousands of stars dotted in the dark sky. Keep your eyes open for nocturnal desert animals, like ringtails, kangaroo rats, owls, bats, and raccoons. 

Where to Stay Near Capitol Reef

Capitol Reef Resort — Stay in a luxury oasis in the desert at Capitol Reef Resort. This hotel is located along Highway 24, about eight minutes from Panorama Point. You’ll enjoy modern amenities, like a pool, a hot tub, and a fitness center. Check Rates and Availability.

Robert’s Roost — Looking for something a little private? This 3-bedroom apartment offers all the mod-cons, including a fully equipped kitchen, laundry facilities, and an outdoor swimming pool to cool off on hot days. Check Rates and Availability.

Camping — The Fruita Campground is the most modern one in Capitol Reef. The campground has 71 campsites and features picnic tables, fire pits, grills, restrooms, and dump stations. A nightly fee of $25 is charged, and the campground is open all year round. Reserve a Spot Here.

What to Pack

Your packing list for Capitol Reef National Park depends on the season you are visiting. But there are a few key items that are must-adds to every list.

Refillable Water Bottle — You’ll need a big water bottle for your trip to Capitol Reef, especially if you are going to the remote areas of the park.

Picnic Basket — There are no lodges or restaurants within the national park, so packing a picnic basket is a must! You’ll find picnic areas where you can sit and enjoy your meal amidst the natural beauty of Capitol Reef.

Day Pack — This nifty backpack is ideal for carrying essential items, like your water bottle, sunscreen, and a map.

Hiking Boots — You’ll need comfortable and durable hiking shoes to explore Capitol Reef’s rugged terrain. You can also bring trekking poles if you’ll be hiking the park’s strenuous trails. 

One Day in Capitol Reef National Park | Wrapped Up

Capitol Reef National Park is one magical place. From the narrow slot canyons with dramatic walls to rugged peaks that soar over the red landscape, this park is a haven for outdoor lovers.

This one-day itinerary takes you through the park’s most popular attractions from dusk to dawn.

So, if you’re on a mission to explore the red-rock state, don’t miss out on stunning overlooks and natural arches by adding Capitol Reef to your Utah National Parks road trip.

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